#640 new test case: dual boot two Fedora 33's
Opened 2 years ago by chrismurphy. Modified 2 years ago

This is a variation on #638 which has yielded this test case
https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/User:Sumantrom/Draft/preserve_home_data

Differences are in bold.

Step 0. Perform a Fedora 33 installation using Automatic partitioning (I used Workstation but any desktop should work because partitioning, subvolume layout, and bootloader stuff is all the same). Reboot and go through g-i-s.

  1. Boot the second Fedora 33 installer, make sensible choices
  2. In Installation Destination, click Custom under Storage Configuration
  3. Locate the previous Fedora installation, click on it to reveal existing mount points for reuse
  4. Select /boot/efi or BIOS Boot mount point, on the right hand side at the top, find ''Mount Point'' field, type in /boot/efi, click ''Update Settings'' button.
  5. Select /boot mount point, on the right hand side at the top, find ''Mount Point'' field, type in /boot, do NOT check the ''Reformat'' box, click ''Update Settings'' button.
  6. Select /home mount point, on the right hand side at the top, find ''Mount Point'' field, type in /home, click ''Update Settings'' button.
  7. Click + button to create a new / mount point (this is required to be a new subvolume, reformat will be checked, cannot be uncheck but the underlying Btrfs is not reformatted, optionally change the name of the subvolume from root00 to rootkde or rootjam or whatever it is). Click ''Update Settings'' button.
  8. Click Done
  9. Perform the installation and reboot the machine
  10. After logging in, check that your home directory or /home contains the files you created on your previous system (check their contents as well)
    Note: If you don't delete the previous root subvolume, the installer will create a new subvolume root00 mounted at /. If you delete the previous root subvolume first, the installer will use the same root name for the new one. Both approaches are valid, you can use whichever approach you choose. Other than consuming space, there is no disadvantage to keeping the old root. striking it, because we want to keep the old root

At step 8, the installer displays a warning banner at the bottom; if clicked,a dialog recommends that /boot be reformatted. This advice needs to be ignored.

Metadata Update from @sumantrom:
- Issue assigned to sumantrom

2 years ago

Writing the test case,right now

Issues:

GRUB menu is hidden by default, kinda annoying.
grub2-editenv - unset menu_auto_hide

Bug: Something erases the previous /boot/loader/entries/ snippets. Workaround: edit the entry, find rootflags=subvol= and change it to the name of the root you want to boot.
https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1874724

Issues:

GRUB menu is hidden by default, kinda annoying.
grub2-editenv - unset menu_auto_hide

Bug: Something erases the previous /boot/loader/entries/ snippets. Workaround: edit the entry, find rootflags=subvol= and change it to the name of the root you want to boot.
https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1874724
I was able to reproduce the bug and have commented on the RHBZ

Metadata Update from @sumantrom:
- Issue tagged with: test cases

2 years ago

Metadata Update from @sumantrom:
- Issue set to the milestone: Fedora 33

2 years ago

@chrismurphy going by the bug state, it still looks new :)
please let me know if I can somehow change the test case or if there is anything to discuss on this ticket?

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Metadata