#206 Welcome to Fedora erisfenixgaia!
Closed: C: Incomplete 4 months ago by ankursinha. Opened 5 months ago by alciregi.

Hello @erisfenixgaia! Welcome to Fedora!

Before we begin, please subscribe to the Fedora join mailing list at
fedora-join@lists.fedoraproject.org
.
We use this list for general discussion, and it is also where the community
shares tasks that need help.

These links are a good read to begin with. They tell you what the Free/Open
Source community is about, and then they'll introduce you to Fedora: what
Fedora is all about, and what we do, and of course, how we do it:

Next, when you're ready, could you please introduce yourself (preferably on
the list) so that the community can get to know you? (interests, skills,
anything you wish to say about yourself really)

Finally, could you let us know how you learned about the Fedora project? Was it
from a colleague, or social media, for example?

If you have any questions at all, please ask! We'll use this ticket to keep in
touch! :)


(originally sent to the mailing list: fedora-join@lists.fedoraproject.org)

Hello!

My name is Eris, from the EST (UTC -5) timezone. I was searching for the most organized Linux community, and I was very impressed by Fedora - especially by the documentation and the "What can I do for Fedora?" website. I am here to learn about the community, and to serve the community in any way possible.

My professional experience is mostly in quality assurance, software testing and test automation, but I am flexible to whatever your needs are. If I can improve the experience that the common person has with this operating system or with the project as a whole, that would be ideal. My primary goal is to advance the cause of humanity, and I see Fedora as a potential vehicle to a free and open-source world. If you feel there is a better community to accomplish this, please direct me there!

Thank you Eris.

Quality assurance, yes, we have a great team.
You can find more information here: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/qa-docs/

Joining the team is pretty simple: subscribe the mailing list (you can use your FAS account to log in to Hyperkitty [1]) and send an introduction. You can start with updates testing right now.
Don't worry about the Onboarding Call: it is listed as a requirement, but since they are held not too frequently, it is only a good to have.

[1] Hyperkitty is a web application providing a web interface to access GNU Mailman archives, and interact with the mailing lists from the browser.

Metadata Update from @alciregi:
- Issue untagged with: C: Introduction requested
- Issue tagged with: S: Introduced myself

4 months ago

Metadata Update from @alciregi:
- Issue tagged with: C: Progress check 1

4 months ago

Hello again! Sorry, it's been a very busy month. From my initial observations I have decided to move on from this project, but I wanted to share some feedback with you before I go.

After spending some time getting to know Fedora and the community I came to see that not only do Red Hat employees contribute to the project - which is known and expected - but some of them appear to be taking leading positions. This gives the impression that a private company has implicit control over the direction of Fedora, with employees assigned to work on the project as part of their work responsibility. I hope that my impression is wrong, because in my opinion it would not be an exaggeration to claim that implicit control is implicit ownership.

Let's assume in the best case scenario that Red Hat employees are volunteering of their own volition, completely outside of the realm of the responsibilities agreed upon with their employer. This amounts to unpaid work provided to Red Hat indirectly by their employees. More importantly, however, there would still be a division between paid and unpaid volunteers. In any case, volunteers that are not employed by Red Hat are still contributing their work to a private company. Thus, they are contributing to their profits, which subsequently influences the salaries of those volunteers that are employed directly by Red Hat.

To put it bluntly, from my analysis this could amount to an exploitative relationship on multiple levels - between paid and unpaid volunteers, between Red Hat and its employees, and between Red Hat and all volunteers. I may have misconceived the situation, but I am suggesting that it is Fedora's (and also Red Hat's) responsibility to clear this misconception in a public and easily accessible manner and to make the nature of this relationship more explicit to prospective volunteers so that they not be misled or even potentially exploited. It may even be helpful going forward to define new terms such as POSS (Private and open-source software) so that the greater open-source community can become conscious of - and possess greater discernment as to - whether or not they are being taken advantage of.

Thank you for your time. Peace!

For reference, this is the introduction sent to the mailing list:
https://lists.fedoraproject.org/archives/list/fedora-join@lists.fedoraproject.org/thread/MFDO4NM6WWPMIMU2ZEZAM7L5A6W4CFKW/

Thanks for your feedback. There are very few positions where someone from Red Hat is appointed and there is good reason to do so. You can see the ones appointed to the Council here:

https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/council/#_appointed_leadership_positions

Apart from this, all Red Hat employees that work on Fedora are considered volunteers and we are all equals in the community. All bodies (FESCo/Mindshare/CommOps) have elections where any one from the community can nominate themselves. For eg:

The reason why you see Red Hat employees in leadership positions is because their jobs at Red Hat are closely linked to the Fedora life-cycle and this allows them to spend more time on Fedora related tasks than us volunteers---perhaps because they are in-charge of the infrastructure (the CPE team, which looks after Fedora/CentOS/other infrastructure which we all share) or because their Red Hat roles are dependent on software in Fedora (because stuff lands in Fedora before it trickles down to RHEL etc.). Indeed, their managers may set up their tasks in such a way that they are able to spend time on Fedora tasks. That's perfectly fine. There are other volunteers in the community where their managers will allow them to work on Fedora tasks because the corporation may be using Fedora in some way.

Most of us at the Join SIG have day-jobs that are not directly related to Fedora. So we can only find time after our work hours and our personal responsibilities to work on Fedora tasks. This is usually only a few hours a day (if we're lucky!). So, I'm personally quite happy to let someone with more time on their hands lead initiatives---we try very hard not to let ourselves lick cookies. I wish my job was more closely related to Fedora so that my manager would let me set time aside to work on Fedora tasks, but unfortunately, that's not the case.

You're not the first person to worry about this, and I'm sure you won't be the last. However, all our discussions and decision making happen in the open (see the devel list where all features landing in Fedora are discussed). We "default to open". So anytime one feels there's an undue influence from an organisation that is not in the best interests of the Fedora community, it is immediately flagged and dealt with openly in the community

Fedora is sponsored by Red Hat, and Fedora Linux remains upstream for CentOS and Red Hat, so it is expected that lots of software that is intended to finally land in these downstream distributions will land in Fedora first, but they must all go through the same process as all other software. No package gets special treatment.

Another important feature of the community is that we assume best intentions. That does not mean that we are naive, but we don't suspect each other of malice by default.

Lastly, contribution is completely voluntary. We contribute because we get something in return (whatever that is---the OS, or just satisfaction from contributing to FOSS). Anyone that has reservations can contribute to other FOSS projects. That's perfectly fine too.

I will now close this ticket. Cheers, and all the best.

Edit: "now close", not "not close"!

Metadata Update from @ankursinha:
- Issue close_status updated to: C: Incomplete
- Issue status updated to: Closed (was: Open)

4 months ago

Metadata Update from @ankursinha:
- Issue tagged with: S: Feedback

4 months ago

I wonder whether it may make sense to add this to some form of FAQ re Fedora?

Sure---you can open a ticket with the Fedora council and they can add something to the main council docs or another appropriate place?

https://pagure.io/Fedora-Council/tickets/issues

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