#121 Issue #69 - fix bad links
Merged 2 months ago by jflory7. Opened 2 months ago by pbokoc.
fedora-docs/ pbokoc/quick-docs iss69  into  master

@@ -1,7 +1,1 @@ 

- :MAJOROSVER: 27

- :WRPM: link:https://docs.fedoraproject.org/quick-docs/en-US/creating-rpm-packages.html

- :WPACKAGE: link:https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Join_the_package_collection_maintainers[How to join the Fedora Package Collection Maintainers]

- :RPMSCHAT: https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Building_RPM_packages_(20090405)

- :MOCKTEST: https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Using_Mock_to_test_package_builds

- :KOJIBUILD: https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Using_the_Koji_build_system

- :YUM: https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Yum

+ :MAJOROSVER: 29

@@ -117,6 +117,4 @@ 

  

  [discrete]

  == Additional resources

- * link:++https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-us/red_hat_enterprise_linux/7/html/networking_guide/sec-introduction_to_networkmanager++[Introduction to NetworkManager]

- 

- * link:++https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-us/red_hat_enterprise_linux/7/html/networking_guide/sec-installing_networkmanager#sec-Interacting_with_NetworkManager[Interacting with NetworkManager]

+ * link:++https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-us/red_hat_enterprise_linux/7/html/networking_guide/getting_started_with_networkmanager++[Getting Started With NetworkManager]

@@ -1,18 +1,20 @@ 

  [id='booting_from_USB_sticks']

  = Booting from USB sticks

  

- Almost all modern PCs can boot from USB sticks. However, how you tell the system to boot from a USB stick varies substantially from system to system. Initially, you can try this: 

+ :toc:

+ 

+ Almost all modern PCs can boot from USB sticks. However, how you tell the system to boot from a USB stick varies substantially from system to system. Initially, you can try this:

  

  . Power off the computer.

  . Plug the USB drive into a USB port.

  . Remove all other portable media, such as CDs, DVDs, floppy disks or other USB sticks.

  . Power on the computer.

- . If the computer is configured to automatically boot from the USB drive, you will see a screen that says "Automatic boot in 10 seconds..." with a countdown. 

+ . If the computer is configured to automatically boot from the USB drive, you will see a screen that says "Automatic boot in 10 seconds..." with a countdown.

  +

  If you do a native UEFI boot, where you will see a rather more minimal boot menu.

  

- If the computer starts to boot off the hard drive as normal, you'll need to manually configure it to boot off the USB drive. Usually, that should work like this: 

-     

+ If the computer starts to boot off the hard drive as normal, you'll need to manually configure it to boot off the USB drive. Usually, that should work like this:

+ 

  . Wait for a safe point to reboot.

  . As the machine starts to reboot, watch carefully for instructions on which key to press. Usually a function key, `Escape`, `Tab` or `Delete` is to be pressed to enter the boot device selection menu, `BIOS setup`, `firmware`, or `UEFI`. Press and hold that key. If you miss the window of opportunity, often only a few seconds, then reboot and try again.

  . Use the firmware, `BIOS`, interface or the boot device menu to put your USB drive first in the boot sequence. It might be listed as a hard drive rather than a removable drive. Each hardware manufacturer has a slightly different method for doing so.

@@ -20,9 +22,9 @@ 

  IMPORTANT: Your computer could become unbootable or lose functionality if you change any other settings. Though these settings can be reverted, you'll need to remember what you changed in order to do so.

  . Save the changes, exit, and the computer should boot from the USB drive.

  

- If your system has a UEFI firmware, it will usually allow you to boot the stick in UEFI native mode or BIOS compatibility mode. If you boot in UEFI native mode and perform a Fedora installation, you will get a UEFI native Fedora installation. If you boot in BIOS compatibility mode and perform a Fedora installation, you will get a BIOS compatibility mode Fedora installation. 

+ If your system has a UEFI firmware, it will usually allow you to boot the stick in UEFI native mode or BIOS compatibility mode. If you boot in UEFI native mode and perform a Fedora installation, you will get a UEFI native Fedora installation. If you boot in BIOS compatibility mode and perform a Fedora installation, you will get a BIOS compatibility mode Fedora installation.

  

- For more information on all this, see the http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Unified_Extensible_Firmware_Interface[UEFI page]. USB sticks written from x86_64 images with link:using-fedora-media-writer[Fedora Media Writer], GNOME Disk Utility, `dd`, other dd-style utilities, and link:proc_creating-and-using-live-cd.html[Creating and using live CD] with the --efi option specified, should be UEFI native bootable. Sticks written with other utilities may not be UEFI native bootable, and sticks written from i686 images will never be UEFI bootable. 

+ For more information on all this, see the http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Unified_Extensible_Firmware_Interface[UEFI page]. USB sticks written from x86_64 images with xref:creating-and-using-a-live-installation-image.adoc#using-fedora-media-writer[Fedora Media Writer], xref:creating-and-using-a-live-installation-image.adoc#gnome-disk-utility[GNOME Disk Utility], `dd`, other dd-style utilities should be UEFI native bootable. Sticks written with other utilities may not be UEFI native bootable, and sticks written from i686 images will never be UEFI bootable.

  

  

  [id='identifying_stick']

@@ -39,7 +41,7 @@ 

  [32656.573467] sd 8:0:0:0: [sdX] Attached SCSI removable disk

  ----

  +

- `sdX` will be `sdb`, `sdc`, `sdd`, etc. 

+ `sdX` will be `sdb`, `sdc`, `sdd`, etc.

  

  [NOTE]

  ====

@@ -1,19 +1,20 @@ 

  :experimental:

+ include::{partialsdir}/attributes.adoc[]

  

  [id='proc_creating-and-using-live-usb']

  = Creating and using live USB

  

- You can write all Fedora ISO images to a USB stick, making this a convenient way on any USB-bootable computer to either install Fedora or try a *live* Fedora environment without writing to the computer's hard disk. You will need a USB stick at least as large as the image you wish to write. 

+ You can write all Fedora ISO images to a USB stick, making this a convenient way on any USB-bootable computer to either install Fedora or try a *live* Fedora environment without writing to the computer's hard disk. You will need a USB stick at least as large as the image you wish to write.

  

  [id='using-fedora-media-writer']

  == Using Fedora Media Writer

  

- The official and supported tool to create a Fedora USB stick is the *Fedora Media Writer* utility, which was formerly known as *LiveUSB Creator*. To learn more about this application and how to use it, refer to the https://docs.fedoraproject.org/f28/install-guide/install/Preparing_for_Installation.html[Preparing for Installation] chapter of the Fedora Installation Guide. 

+ The official and supported tool to create a Fedora USB stick is the *Fedora Media Writer* utility, which was formerly known as *LiveUSB Creator*. To learn more about this application and how to use it, refer to the https://docs.fedoraproject.org/{MAJOROSVER}/install-guide/install/Preparing_for_Installation.html[Preparing for Installation] chapter of the Fedora Installation Guide.

  

  

  [IMPORTANT]

  ====

- *Fedora Media Writer* destroys all data on the USB stick. If you need a non-destructive write method (to preserve existing data on your USB stick) or support for 'data persistence', you can use the link:using-the-livecd-iso-to-disk-tool[livecd-iso-to-disk] utility on Fedora.

+ *Fedora Media Writer* destroys all data on the USB stick. If you need a non-destructive write method (to preserve existing data on your USB stick) or support for 'data persistence', you can use the xref:creating-and-using-a-live-installation-image.adoc#using-the-livecd-iso-to-disk-tool[livecd-iso-to-disk] utility on Fedora.

  ====

  

  [id='gnome-disk-utility']

@@ -94,7 +95,7 @@ 

  # livecd-iso-to-disk --home-size-mb 2048 Fedora-Workstation-Live-x86_64-28-1.1.iso /dev/sdX

  ----

  

- This will create a 2 GiB filesystem that will be mounted as `/home` each time the stick is booted, allowing you to preserve data in `/home` across boots. 

+ This will create a 2 GiB filesystem that will be mounted as `/home` each time the stick is booted, allowing you to preserve data in `/home` across boots.

  

  To enable 'data persistence' support - so changes you make to the entire live environment will persist across boots - add the `--overlay-size-mb` parameter to add a persistent data storage area to the target stick. For example:

  [option="nowrap"]

@@ -103,16 +104,16 @@ 

  # livecd-iso-to-disk --overlay-size-mb 2048 Fedora-Workstation-Live-x86_64-28-1.1.iso /dev/sdX

  ----

  

- Here, `_2048_` is the desired size (in megabytes) of the overlay. The `livecd-iso-to-disk` tool will not accept an overlay size value greater than _4095_ for VFAT, but for ext[234] filesystems it is only limited by the available space. 

+ Here, `_2048_` is the desired size (in megabytes) of the overlay. The `livecd-iso-to-disk` tool will not accept an overlay size value greater than _4095_ for VFAT, but for ext[234] filesystems it is only limited by the available space.

  

  [NOTE]

  ====

- Due to the way it's currently implemented, every single change to this form of overlay, writes AND deletes, subtracts from its free space so it will eventually be "used up" and your USB stick will no longer boot. You can use `dmsetup` status `live-rw` to see how much space remains in the overlay. 

+ Due to the way it's currently implemented, every single change to this form of overlay, writes AND deletes, subtracts from its free space so it will eventually be "used up" and your USB stick will no longer boot. You can use `dmsetup` status `live-rw` to see how much space remains in the overlay.

  

  The output will contain something like snapshot `42296/204800`, indicating that 4229 of 204800 512-byte sectors are allocated. Because of these limitations, it is advisable to use the `system-level` persistence sparingly, for configuration changes and important security updates only. Or, if you have sufficient disk space available, changes to the `LiveOS` root filesystem snapshot can be merged into a new copy of the root filesystem.

  ====

  

- You can combine `--home-size-mb` and `--overlay-size-mb`, in which case data written to `/home` will not exhaust the persistent overlay. 

+ You can combine `--home-size-mb` and `--overlay-size-mb`, in which case data written to `/home` will not exhaust the persistent overlay.

  

  

  === Using a direct write method

@@ -123,7 +124,7 @@ 

  This method will destroy all data on the USB stick. If you need a non-destructive write method, to preserve existing data on your USB stick, and/or support for `data persistence`, you can use the `livecd-iso-to-disk` utility on Fedora.

  ====

  

- This method directly writes the image to the USB stick much like link:#using-fedora-media-writer[Fedora Media Writer] or GNOME Disk Utility, but uses a command line utility named `dd`. Like the other _direct write_ methods, it will destroy all data on the stick and does not support any of the advanced features like data persistence, but it is a very reliable method. The `dd` tool is available on most Unix-like operating systems, including Linux distributions and OS X, and a Windows port is available. This may be your best method if you cannot use link:#using-fedora-media-writer[Fedora Media Writer] or GNOME Disk Utility, or just if you prefer command line utilities and want a simple, quick way to write a stick.

+ This method directly writes the image to the USB stick much like xref:creating-and-using-a-live-installation-image.adoc#using-fedora-media-writer[Fedora Media Writer] or GNOME Disk Utility, but uses a command line utility named `dd`. Like the other _direct write_ methods, it will destroy all data on the stick and does not support any of the advanced features like data persistence, but it is a very reliable method. The `dd` tool is available on most Unix-like operating systems, including Linux distributions and OS X, and a Windows port is available. This may be your best method if you cannot use xref:creating-and-using-a-live-installation-image.adoc#using-fedora-media-writer[Fedora Media Writer] or GNOME Disk Utility, or just if you prefer command line utilities and want a simple, quick way to write a stick.

  

  . Identify the name of the USB drive partition. If using this method on Windows, with the port linked above, the `dd --list` command should provide you with the correct name.

  . *Unmount all mounted partition from that device*. This is very important, otherwise the written image might get corrupted. You can umount all mounted partitions from the device with `umount /dev/sdX*`, where `_X_` is the appropriate letter, e.g. `umount /dev/sdc*`.

@@ -148,9 +149,9 @@ 

  

  [NOTE]

  ====

- UNetbootin may work in some cases but not others - for instance, it will likely create a stick that is bootable in BIOS mode, but not UEFI mode. Fedora cannot guarantee support for UNetbootin-written images. 

+ UNetbootin may work in some cases but not others - for instance, it will likely create a stick that is bootable in BIOS mode, but not UEFI mode. Fedora cannot guarantee support for UNetbootin-written images.

  

- While your results may vary, it is usually the case that the Fedora Media Writer, `livecd-iso-to-disk`, GNOME, and `dd` methods give better results than UNetbootin. If you encounter problems with UNetbootin, please contact the UNetbootin developers, not the Fedora developers. 

+ While your results may vary, it is usually the case that the Fedora Media Writer, `livecd-iso-to-disk`, GNOME, and `dd` methods give better results than UNetbootin. If you encounter problems with UNetbootin, please contact the UNetbootin developers, not the Fedora developers.

  ====

  

  http://unetbootin.github.io/[UNetbootin] is a graphical, bootable USB image creator. Using it will allow you to preserve any data you have in the USB drive. If you have trouble booting, however, you may wish to try with a blank, cleanly FAT32-formatted drive.

@@ -169,7 +170,7 @@ 

  [id='creating_usb_stick_from_a_running_live_environment']

  == Creating a USB stick from a running live environment

  

- If you are already running a live CD, DVD, or USB and want to convert that into a bootable USB stick, run the following command: 

+ If you are already running a live CD, DVD, or USB and want to convert that into a bootable USB stick, run the following command:

  

  [option="nowrap"]

  ----

@@ -9,8 +9,7 @@ 

  +

  This command generates a key pair that consists of a public and a private key.

  Other people use your public key to authenticate and/or decrypt your communications.

- Distribute your *public* key as widely as possible, especially to people who you know will want to receive authentic communications from you, such as a mailing list.

- The Fedora Documentation Project, for example, asks participants to include a GPG public key in their link:DocsProject/SelfIntroduction[self-introduction].

+ Distribute your *public* key as widely as possible, especially to people who you know will want to receive authentic communications from you, such as a mailing list..

  

  . Press the kbd:[Enter] key to assign a default value if desired.

  The first prompt asks you to select what kind of key you prefer:

@@ -47,7 +46,7 @@ 

        <n>w = key expires in n weeks

        <n>m = key expires in n months

        <n>y = key expires in n years

- Key is valid for? (0) 

+ Key is valid for? (0)

  ----

  +

  Entering a value of `1y`, for example, makes the key valid for one year.

@@ -85,7 +84,7 @@ 

  ----

  pub  1024D/1B2AFA1C 2005-03-31 John Q. Doe (Fedora Docs Project) <jqdoe@example.com>

  Key fingerprint = 117C FE83 22EA B843 3E86  6486 4320 545E 1B2A FA1C

- sub  1024g/CEA4B22E 2005-03-31 [expires: 2006-03-31] 

+ sub  1024g/CEA4B22E 2005-03-31 [expires: 2006-03-31]

  ----

  

  The key fingerprint is a shorthand signature for your key.

@@ -19,6 +19,6 @@ 

  

  Packaged web applications will usually provide Fedora-specific instructions in a documentation file. For instance, Wordpress provides the files `/usr/share/doc/wordpress/README.fedora` and `/usr/share/doc/wordpress/README.fedora-multiuser`.

  

- Packaged web applications usually restrict access by default so you can access them only from the server host itself, to ensure you can run all initial configuration safely and things like administration interfaces are not left accessible to the public. For information on how to broaden access, see link:enabling-access-to-web-applications[Enabling access to web applications].

+ Packaged web applications usually restrict access by default so you can access them only from the server host itself, to ensure you can run all initial configuration safely and things like administration interfaces are not left accessible to the public. For information on how to broaden access, see xref:getting-started-with-apache-http-server.adoc#enabling-access-to-web-applications[Enabling access to web applications].

  

  Web applications commonly require the use of a database server. This wiki contains information on installing and configuring https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/PostgreSQL[PostgreSQL] and https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/MariaDB[MariaDB] on Fedora.

@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@ 

  [[procedure-run-docker-using-sudo]]

  = Run Docker using sudo

  

- . Set up [command]`sudo` as shown in link:con_using-sudo-assign-admin-privileges.html[Using sudo to assign administrator privileges].

+ . Set up [command]`sudo` as shown in xref:performing-administration-tasks-using-sudo.adoc.adoc#con_using-sudo-assign-admin-privileges[Using sudo to assign administrator privileges].

  . Create an alias for running the docker command by adding the following line to your `~/.bashrc` file:

  +

  ----

@@ -64,7 +64,7 @@ 

  # chmod 0600 /etc/pki/tls/certs/myhost.com.crt

  ----

  

- After installing the existing certificate, set up the certificate using link:mod-ssl-configuration[mod_ssl configuration].

+ After installing the existing certificate, set up the certificate using <<mod_ssl configuration>>.

  

  

  [id='mod-ssl-configuration']

@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@ 

  [[qemukvm-without-libvirt]]

  == QEMU/KVM without libvirt

  

- QEMU/KVM can be invoked directly without libvirt, however you cannot to use tools such as `virt-manager`, `virt-install`, or `virsh`. Plain QEMU (without KVM) can also virtualize other processor architectures like ARM or PowerPC. 

+ QEMU/KVM can be invoked directly without libvirt, however you cannot to use tools such as `virt-manager`, `virt-install`, or `virsh`. Plain QEMU (without KVM) can also virtualize other processor architectures like ARM or PowerPC.

  

  [[xen]]

  == Xen

@@ -34,4 +34,4 @@ 

  = Troubleshooting and known issues

  

  For a list of known unresolved issues, as well as troubleshooting tips,

- see FIXME link:How_to_debug_Virtualization_problems[How to debug virtualization problems]

+ see link:https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/How_to_debug_Virtualization_problems[How to debug virtualization problems]

@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ 

  [caption="Entering Anaconda, Montana. A city probably named after this installation program. David Cantrell took this picture in 2011. His grey VW Jetta is parked in the background."]

  image::DSC_3217.JPG[Anaconda,400]

  

- Anaconda is the installation program used by Fedora, Red Hat Enterprise Linux and link:anaconda_distros.html[some other distributions].

+ Anaconda is the installation program used by Fedora, Red Hat Enterprise Linux and xref:anaconda/anaconda_distros.adoc[some other distributions].

  

  During installation, a target computer's hardware is identified and configured, and the appropriate file systems for the system's architecture are created.

  Finally, Anaconda allows the user to install the operating system software on the target computer.

@@ -25,12 +25,12 @@ 

  If you are a user having problems with Anaconda, please use the user support forum for your distribution such as http://forums.fedoraforum.org/forumdisplay.php?f=6[Fedora Forum] or https://lists.fedoraproject.org/admin/lists/users.lists.fedoraproject.org/[the fedora-users mailing list].

  

  From time to time, we may distribute updates for Anaconda to fix problems in Fedora releases.

- The link:anaconda_updates.html[updates] page explains how to use these updates images.

+ The xref:anaconda/anaconda_updates.adoc[updates] page explains how to use these updates images.

  

  [id="advanced-users"]

  == Advanced Users

  

- If you are an advanced user of Anaconda, you should check out https://anaconda-installer.readthedocs.io/en/latest/boot-options.html[our reference to Anaconda command line options], https://anaconda-installer.readthedocs.io/en/latest/kickstart.html[our kickstart file format documentation] and link:anaconda_logging.html[our reference to logging capabilities of Anaconda].

+ If you are an advanced user of Anaconda, you should check out https://anaconda-installer.readthedocs.io/en/latest/boot-options.html[our reference to Anaconda command line options], https://anaconda-installer.readthedocs.io/en/latest/kickstart.html[our kickstart file format documentation] and xref:anaconda/anaconda_logging.adoc[our reference to logging capabilities of Anaconda].

  

  There is a mailing list devoted to the use of kickstart.

  You can find the list signup and archive information at http://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/kickstart-list[kickstart list].

@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ 

  [id="distribution-builders"]

  == Distribution Builders

  

- For information on how to customize Anaconda and trees created with it, please see link:anaconda_product_image.html[product.img].

+ For information on how to customize Anaconda and trees created with it, please see xref:anaconda/anaconda_product_image.adoc[product.img].

  

  [id="mailing-lists"]

  == Mailing Lists

@@ -121,7 +121,7 @@ 

  * `man tailf`

  

  == Remote logging via virtio

- QEMU/KVM in Fedora 13 and onwards allows one to create virtual machines with link:http://fedoraprojet.org/wiki/Features/VirtioSerial[multiple virtio char devices] exposed to the guest machine.

+ QEMU/KVM in Fedora 13 and onwards allows one to create virtual machines with link:http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Features/VirtioSerial[multiple virtio char devices] exposed to the guest machine.

  One such device can be used to forward anaconda logs to the host machine.

  In that way we can get logs forwarded in real time, as soon the anaconda logging subsystem is initialized (early) and not need to wait for the network to come up.

  Also, it's the only way to forward the logs in a no-network setup.

@@ -28,4 +28,4 @@ 

  Now you can include product.img in the tree, inside `/images/`.

  

  Alternatively you can now use lorax to create product.img as part of the boot.iso creation process.

- This is supported by lorax-21.27-1 and is documented link:http://rhinstaller.github.io/lorax/product-images.html[here] in the Lorax source tree.

+ This is supported by lorax-21.27-1 and later and is documented link:https://weldr.io/lorax/product-images.html[here] in the Lorax source tree.

@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ 

  Automatic Updates

  -----------------

  

- You must decide whether to use automatic link:dnf[DNF] or link:yum[YUM]

+ You must decide whether to use automatic xref:dnf.adoc[DNF]

  updates on each of your machines. There are a number of arguments both

  for and against automatic updates to consider. However, there is no

  single answer to this question: It is up to the system administrator or

@@ -7,8 +7,8 @@ 

  This is a short hands-on tutorial on writing RPM files, showing how to quickly step up to create simple source and binary software packages.

  It assumes some familiarity with using pre-made RPM packages, and with the FOSS building process.

  

- For comprehensive information on how to create RPM files, including more detailed tips, refer to {WRPM}[How to create an RPM package].

- If you plan to create an RPM package for the Fedora repository, follow the process for {WPACKAGE}, including following the various Fedora guidance.

+ For comprehensive information on how to create RPM files, including more detailed tips, refer to xref:creating-rpm-packages.adoc[How to create an RPM package].

+ If you plan to create an RPM package for the Fedora repository, follow the process for link:https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Join_the_package_collection_maintainers[How to join the Fedora Package Collection Maintainers], including following the various Fedora guidance.

  

  This tutorial demonstrates packaging of the GNU "Hello World" project.

  While the C program printing "Hello World" to standard output is trivial, the GNU version contains most of the usual peripheral components associated with a typical FOSS project, including the configuration/build/install environment, documentation, internationalization, etc.

@@ -74,7 +74,7 @@ 

  == Inside a Spec File

  

  The fields in our `.spec` file need slight editing.

- Please follow the {WRPM}[Fedora rules] for these fields.

+ Please follow the xref:creating-rpm-packages.adoc[Fedora rules] for these fields.

  In our case, the file might start as follows:

  

  [source, RPMSpec]

@@ -137,7 +137,8 @@ 

  This is an iterative process; after editing the `.spec` file, rerun `rpmbuild`.

  

  Since our program uses translations and internationalization, we are seeing a lot of undeclared i18 files.

- The link:https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Packaging:Guidelines#Handling_Locale_Files[recommended method] to declare them is:

+ 

+ The xref:packaging-guidelines:guidelines:index.adoc#_handling_locale_files[recommended method] to declare them is:

  

  * find the filenames in the `%install` step: `%find_lang %\{name}`

  * add the required build dependencies: `BuildRequires: gettext`

@@ -248,20 +249,17 @@ 

  

  == References

  

- * {WRPM}[How to create an RPM package]

+ * xref:creating-rpm-packages.adoc[How to create an RPM package]

  

- * {RPMSCHAT}[Building RPM packages (20090405)]

+ * link:https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Building_RPM_packages_(20090405)[Building RPM packages (20090405)]

  

- * {MOCKTEST}[Using Mock to test package builds]

+ * link:https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Using_Mock_to_test_package_builds[Using Mock to test package builds]

  

- * {KOJIBUILD}[Using the Koji build system]

+ * link:https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Using_the_Koji_build_system[Using the Koji build system]

  

  == History

  

- Przemek Klosowski wrote this tutorial when he worked through link:Building_RPM_packages_%2820090405%29[Christoph Wickert's IRC session on building RPMs] using Rahul Sundaram suggestion of GNU "Hello World" as a test case.

- After he wrote up his experience, he found out about the excellent and extensive link:How_to_create_an_RPM_package[How to create an RPM package] page on this wiki, as well as the link:http://www.absolutepanic.org/blog/2009/07/building-a-gnu-hello-world-rpm[Christian Lyder Jacobsen's website].

+ Przemek Klosowski wrote this tutorial when he worked through link:https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Building_RPM_packages_(20090405)[Christoph Wickert's IRC session on building RPMs] using Rahul Sundaram suggestion of GNU "Hello World" as a test case.

+ After he wrote up his experience, he found out about the excellent and extensive xref:creating-rpm-packages.adoc[How to create an RPM package] page on this wiki, as well as the Christian Lyder Jacobsen's website, which is unfortunately not available anymore.

  However, Christian isn't planning to update his site, and it seemed that a 5-minute 'fast food' alternative to the more extensive article might suit some people.

- More in-depth information on using and building RPM packages is available from link:Yum[other sources].

- 

- See a typo, something missing or out of date, or anything else which can be improved?

- Edit this document at https://pagure.io/fedora-docs/quick-docs.

+ More in-depth information on using and building RPM packages is available from link:dnf.adoc[other sources].

@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ 

  

  include::{partialsdir}/unreviewed-message.adoc[]

  

- link:++https://github.com/rpm-software-management/dnf-plugin-system-upgrade++[`dnf-plugin-system-upgrade`] is a plugin for the link:++dnf.html++[DNF] package manager and is used to upgrade your system to the current release of Fedora.

+ link:++https://github.com/rpm-software-management/dnf-plugin-system-upgrade++[`dnf-plugin-system-upgrade`] is a plugin for the xref:dnf.adoc[DNF] package manager and is used to upgrade your system to the current release of Fedora.

  For Atomic Host, which uses rpm-ostree, you may refer to link:++https://rpm-ostree.readthedocs.io/en/latest/manual/administrator-handbook/++[Read The Docs: rpm-ostree] for details.

  

  This is the recommended command-line upgrade method for Fedora 21 and later and works as follows:

@@ -303,7 +303,7 @@ 

  

  It is highly recommended to upgrade across just one release (e.g. 27 to 28).

  However, for the first month or so after a new release, upgrades from the last-but-one release are 'supported' (N-2, where N is the current release).

- The link:fedora-life-cycle.html++[Fedora Release Life Cycle] is specifically designed to provide this approximate one month "grace period" to allow users the choice to upgrade their systems on a yearly basis, or once every two releases.

+ The link:https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Fedora_Release_Life_Cycle[Fedora Release Life Cycle] is specifically designed to provide this approximate one month "grace period" to allow users the choice to upgrade their systems on a yearly basis, or once every two releases.

  

  Around a month after the new release comes out, the last-but-one release becomes End Of Life (EOL).

  The upgrade is likely to work successfully after the release goes end-of-life, but the time period after the new release may be uncertain.

file modified
+4 -4

@@ -45,7 +45,7 @@ 

  

  * `update/upgrade` - checks the repositories for newer packages and updates them.

  

- For more DNF commands refer to the man pages by typing `man dnf` at the command-line, or link:++http://dnf.readthedocs.io/en/latest/command_ref.html[DNF Read The Docs]

+ For more DNF commands refer to the man pages by typing `man dnf` at the command-line, or link:http://dnf.readthedocs.io/en/latest/command_ref.html[DNF Read The Docs]

  

  [[sect-automatic-updates]]

  == Automatic Updates

@@ -53,19 +53,19 @@ 

  The `dnf-automatic` package is a component that allows automatic download and installation of updates.

  It can automatically monitor and report, via e-mail, the availability of updates or send a log about downloaded packages and installed updates.

  

- For more information, refer to the link:++http://dnf.readthedocs.org/en/latest/automatic.html[Read the Docs: DNF-Automatic] page.

+ For more information, refer to the link:http://dnf.readthedocs.org/en/latest/automatic.html[Read the Docs: DNF-Automatic] page.

  

  [[sect-system-upgrades]]

  == System Upgrades

  

  The Fedora system can be upgraded directly with DNF, or with the DNF system upgrade plugin.

- Refer to the link:++upgrading.html++[Upgrade] document for more details.

+ Refer to the xref:dnf-system-upgrade.adoc[DNF System Upgrade] document for more details.

  

  [[sect-language-support-using-dnf]]

  == Language Support Using DNF

  

  DNF can be used to install or remove Language Support.

- A detailed description with a list of available languages can be found on link:++https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/I18N/Language_Support_Using_Dnf[Language Support Using Dnf] page.

+ A detailed description with a list of available languages can be found on link:https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/I18N/Language_Support_Using_Dnf[Language Support Using Dnf] page.

  

  [[sect-plugins]]

  == Plugins

@@ -45,8 +45,8 @@ 

  system is based on http://rpm.org[rpm] , the RPM Package Manager, with

  several higher level tools built on top of it, most notably

  https://www.freedesktop.org/software/PackageKit/[PackageKit] (default

- gui) and link:Yum[ yum] (command line tool). As of Fedora 22, yum has

- been replaced by link:Dnf[ dnf]. The Gnome Package Manager is another

+ gui) and Yum (command line tool). As of Fedora 22, yum has

+ been replaced by xref:dnf.adoc[DNF]. The Gnome Package Manager is another

  GUI package manager.

  

  [[advantages-of-package-management-systems]]

@@ -135,9 +135,7 @@ 

  Package Management tools

  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  

- link:Dnf[ dnf] - Dandified Yum

- 

- link:Yum[ yum] - Yellowdog Updater Modified

+ xref:dnf.adoc[dnf] - Dandified Yum

  

  https://www.freedesktop.org/software/PackageKit/[PackageKit] -

  PackageKit gui tool ('add/remove software' in your menu)

@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@ 

  [[the-fedora-repository]]

  == The fedora repository

  

- The _fedora_ repository exists for all Fedora releases after they have link:Releases/Branched[Branched] from link:Releases/Rawhide[Rawhide]. It is represented for Yum or http://dnf.baseurl.org/[DNF] in the `fedora.repo` file in the repository path. For any Fedora installation, this repository will be enabled by default, and should usually remain so.

+ The _fedora_ repository exists for all Fedora releases after they have link:https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Releases/Branched[Branched] from link:https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Releases/Rawhide[Rawhide]. It is represented for Yum or http://dnf.baseurl.org/[DNF] in the `fedora.repo` file in the repository path. For any Fedora installation, this repository will be enabled by default, and should usually remain so.

  

  [[the-fedora-repository-in-stable-releases]]

  === The _fedora_ repository in stable releases

@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ 

  

  ====

  

- While booting the system the link:++grub2.html++[GRUB2] menu will be displayed.

+ While booting the system the xref:bootloading-with-grub2.adoc[GRUB2] menu will be displayed.

  To boot the system into rescue mode using `bash` follow these steps:

  

  . Use the arrow keys to select the boot entry you want to edit

@@ -90,7 +90,7 @@ 

  

  ====

  

- To download and create a live USB of Fedora Workstation, follow the instructions on the link:++live-usb.html++[Fedora USB Live Media Quick Doc].

+ To download and create a live USB of Fedora Workstation, follow the instructions on the xref:creating-and-using-a-live-installation-image.adoc[Fedora USB Live Media Quick Doc].

  

  ====

  

@@ -197,6 +197,6 @@ 

  

  .. Temporarily move the system hard disk to another machine, and follow the procedures above to reset the root password.

  

- . If you have set a password for your boot loader, refer to link:++creating-and-using-a-live-installation-image.html++[Creating and Using a Live Installation Image].

+ . If you have set a password for your boot loader, refer to xref:creating-and-using-a-live-installation-image.adoc[Creating and Using a Live Installation Image].

  

  . If you want to reset the boot loader password, refer to the instructions on how to link:++https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Reset_Bootloader_Password++[Reset the Bootloader Password].

@@ -1,6 +1,7 @@ 

  ifdef::context[:parent-context: {context}]

  :context: securing-the-system-by-keeping-it-up-to-date

  :experimental:

+ include::{partialsdir}/attributes.adoc[]

  

  [id='securing-the-system-by-keeping-it-up-to-date']

  = Securing the system by keeping it up-to-date

@@ -9,9 +10,9 @@ 

  

  This section explains:

  

- * Why it is important to update your system regularly (link:#why-it-is-important-keeping-your-system-up-to-date[Why it is important to keep your system up-to-date])

- * How to apply updates manually by using GUI or CLI (link:#manual-updating-using-cli[Manual updating using CLI])

- * How to enable automatic updates (link:#setting-automatic-updates[Setting automatic updates])

+ * Why it is important to update your system regularly (xref:securing-the-system-by-keeping-it-up-to-date.adoc#why-it-is-important-to-keep-your-system-up-to-date[Why it is important to keep your system up-to-date])

+ * How to apply updates manually by using GUI or CLI (xref:securing-the-system-by-keeping-it-up-to-date.adoc#manual-updating-using-cli[Manual updating using CLI])

+ * How to enable automatic updates (xref:securing-the-system-by-keeping-it-up-to-date.adoc#setting-automatic-updates[Setting automatic updates])

  

  include::{partialsdir}/con_why-it-is-important-keeping-your-system-up-to-date.adoc[leveloffset=+1]

  

@@ -25,7 +26,7 @@ 

  [discrete]

  == Additional Resources

  

- * The https://docs-old.fedoraproject.org/en-US/Fedora/26/html/System_Administrators_Guide/ch-DNF.html[DNF] chapter in the Fedora System Administrator's Guide

+ * The xref:{MAJOROSVER}@fedora:system-administrators-guide:package-management/DNF.adoc[DNF] chapter in the Fedora System Administrator's Guide

  

  ifdef::parent-context[:context: {parent-context}]

  ifndef::parent-context[:!context:]

@@ -33,7 +33,7 @@ 

  * http://0pointer.de/blog/projects/ - Lennart's blog has lots of information about systemd. Lennart is the primary systemd developer

  * http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/systemd/FrequentlyAskedQuestions

  * http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/systemd/TipsAndTricks

- * link:Features/systemd[ Features Fedora 15:systemd]

+ * https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Features/systemd[ Features Fedora 15:systemd]

  * http://fosdem.org/2011/interview/lennart-poettering.html[Interview with the developer]

  ifdef::parent-context[:context: {parent-context}]

  ifndef::parent-context[:!context:]

@@ -52,7 +52,7 @@ 

  They are suitable for users developing or testing Fedora before public release.

  They are *NOT SUITABLE* for regular day-to-day use unless you are a fairly experienced user, and certainly not suitable for mission-critical use.

  You should read through those pages carefully before deciding to run Branched or Rawhide.

- See the link:++fedora-life-cycle.html++[Fedora Life Cycle Quick Doc] for more information on how the whole Fedora cycle works from Rawhide, to Branched, to the milestone releases (Alpha and Beta), to a 'final' release.

+ See the link:++https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Fedora_Release_Life_Cycle++[Fedora Life Cycle Quick Doc] for more information on how the whole Fedora cycle works from Rawhide, to Branched, to the milestone releases (Alpha and Beta), to a 'final' release.

  

  Upgrading to a Branched release or to Rawhide can be done with the xref:dnf-system-upgrade.adoc[DNF System Upgrade Plugin].

  Carefully read this page as there are some special notes to ensure a successful upgrade.

Fixes #69 plus some more problems I ran into, such as a bunch of single-use attributes and using links instead of xrefs in some places.

It might be better to write this string with :MAJOROSVER: for the Fedora version to always point it to the latest version of Fedora automatically each release.

I think this can also be written as an xref with Antora to cross-link between docs in two different repos. With page cross references, I think this is correct but I'm not certain: xref::packaging-guidelines/#_handling_locale_files.

Metadata Update from @jflory7:
- Pull-request tagged with: improvement
- Request assigned

2 months ago

1 new commit added

  • A few fixes based on PR review
2 months ago

@jwf thanks for the review, I fixed both issues. The link to the sysadmin guide can be an xref as well so I used that.

rebased onto 4e72337

2 months ago

@pbokoc Looks good to me! :thumbsup:

Pull-Request has been merged by jflory7

2 months ago
Metadata
Changes Summary 22
+1 -7
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modules/ROOT/pages/_partials/attributes.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/_partials/con_Getting-started-with-nmcli.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/_partials/proc_booting-from-usb-sticks.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/_partials/proc_creating-and-using-live-usb.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/_partials/proc_creating-gpg-keys-cli.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/_partials/proc_installing-webapps.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/_partials/proc_run-docker-using-sudo.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/_partials/proc_securing-apache-httpd.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/_partials/ref_other-virtualization-options.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/anaconda/anaconda.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/anaconda/anaconda_logging.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/anaconda/anaconda_product_image.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/autoupdates.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/create-hello-world-rpm.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/dnf-system-upgrade.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/dnf.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/package-management.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/repositories.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/reset-root-password.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/securing-the-system-by-keeping-it-up-to-date.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/understanding-and-administering-systemd.adoc
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modules/ROOT/pages/upgrading.adoc