#103 Would a coucil member please have the time to take a classroom session on Free and Open Souce Software and Fedora's role in FOSS?
Closed: no action needed 2 years ago Opened 2 years ago by ankursinha.

We're working on restarting the Fedora IRC classroom sessions. We have a few volunteer instructors now so we're going to get the ball rolling in the next fortnight or so.

I would really like to have a regular "Free and Open Source Software 101" classroom session (maybe every release, or every few months) that aims to teach about and spread awareness of the movement and Fedora's role in it. While any community member could take it, I feel that someone who has been around long enough and has enough experience with FOSS would make a much better instructor, especially since the target audience would be expected to consist of quite a few that understand neither the philosophy nor the system.

The session could touch upon:

  • the history of FOSS - how it came about, why its important, what the philosophy behind it is
  • advantages and disadvantages of FOSS from a software development perspective
  • FOSS community dynamics
  • the history of Fedora
  • how Fedora aligns with FOSS
  • and maybe concluding remarks on our way forward as a FOSS Linux distribution

Discussing tools is generally much simpler than discussing a way of thinking, and so, I was hoping the experienced members of the council could maybe take these sessions.

Cheers!


I don't think I can commit to doing this in the near-term because of other commitments. I wonder if @dkaspar might be able to do it and a good choice. I know he gives similar talks in person.

I'm open. I might like to attend a few of the existing classroom sessions first so I better get the concept.

Hello folks! :) One of my personal goals (to bring more good to our World) is becoming FOSS advocate. Because of it, I have started to regularly give talks about History of FOSS, and how it lead to The Open Source Way. I usually give this talk to new IT universities students, and during OpenHouse event.

My talk starts in the early days of computers as early days of "Open Source" concepts, goes through the subculture of hackers, and ends up in today's state of FOSS world.

Honestly, it can be boring for most of the people who don't care about history at all. But I try to interleave it with some funny or interesting moments that happened, and I think if people are really interested in this, it should be OK.

Expected duration for my talk is ~90 minutes. where ~20 minutes is usually some video of real-world example, where the Open Source Way is doing some good, or how it can help solve problems better than conventional approach.

Initially the talk had 20 minutes (without video), but I found out that it needed expansion. It's hard to explain some context and dynamics of our history in such short time. I keep updating my presentation, and it has grown up since then.

IMHO, since this is a talk, I would be hard to say all of this via IRC. If you would be interested in this talk, the best way I can think of right now is to do some Twitch/YouTube live-streaming, and let people ask questions directly over Twitch/YouTube or IRC. IMHO, it should be in our capabilities in Red Hat to set up such a streaming event.

If you're interested, let me know. I will gladly give that talk. :)

Best regards,

Dee'Kej

Hello folks! :) One of my personal goals (to bring more good to our World) is becoming FOSS advocate. Because of it, I have started to regularly give talks about History of FOSS, and how it lead to The Open Source Way. I usually give this talk to new IT universities students, and during OpenHouse event.
My talk starts in the early days of computers as early days of "Open Source" concepts, goes through the subculture of hackers, and ends up in today's state of FOSS world.
Honestly, it can be boring for most of the people who don't care about history at all. But I try to interleave it with some funny or interesting moments that happened, and I think if people are really interested in this, it should be OK.

I personally think the history of the movement really helps people understand the philosophy - why we use FOSS (as in, it's more than just having access to source code and getting to use a lot of great software without paying for it)

Expected duration for my talk is ~90 minutes. where ~20 minutes is usually some video of real-world example, where the Open Source Way is doing some good, or how it can help solve problems better than conventional approach.
Initially the talk had 20 minutes (without video), but I found out that it needed expansion. It's hard to explain some context and dynamics of our history in such short time. I keep updating my presentation, and it has grown up since then.
IMHO, since this is a talk, I would be hard to say all of this via IRC. If you would be interested in this talk, the best way I can think of right now is to do some Twitch/YouTube live-streaming, and let people ask questions directly over Twitch/YouTube or IRC. IMHO, it should be in our capabilities in Red Hat to set up such a streaming event.
If you're interested, let me know. I will gladly give that talk. :)

@dkaspar - it'd be awesome if you did your talk - over whatever mode of communication you choose. We're discussing a schedule on the classroom ML, hoping to start in a few weeks now. Would you like to start it off? We have volunteers for the following, and this is the order I've proposed:

  • Start with FOSS 101
  • The one that doesn't require much technical knowledge - Magazine 101
  • Then a quick introduction to the Linux command line and utilities - Command line 101
  • Then the text editors - Vim 101, Emacs 101
  • Then slightly more technical - QA 101
  • Then even more technical and more software focussed - Git 101
  • Then the process that uses a lot of the afore-learned skills - Packaging 101

PS: I'm only suggesting IRC as the mode of communication for our sessions because we haven't set up a community based platform to support video sessions yet. Of course, if folks can manage the required infrastructure themselves, that's works :)

I personally think the history of the movement really helps people understand the philosophy - why we use FOSS (as in, it's more than just having access to source code and getting to use a lot of great software without paying for it)

Yes, that is one of my thoughts as well. IMHO to understand the philosophy of FOSS, people must first understand the time and context how it all started, and how it helped to shape the Open Source Way.

@dkaspar - it'd be awesome if you did your talk - over whatever mode of communication you choose. We're discussing a schedule on the classroom ML, hoping to start in a few weeks now. Would you like to start it off?

That shouldn't be a problem in a few weeks (I guess). Do you have any specific date in mind? :)

We have volunteers for the following, and this is the order I've proposed:

Start with FOSS 101
The one that doesn't require much technical knowledge - Magazine 101
Then a quick introduction to the Linux command line and utilities - Command line 101
Then the text editors - Vim 101, Emacs 101
Then slightly more technical - QA 101
Then even more technical and more software focussed - Git 101
Then the process that uses a lot of the afore-learned skills - Packaging 101

This sounds reasonable to me.

PS: I'm only suggesting IRC as the mode of communication for our sessions because we haven't set up a community based platform to support video sessions yet. Of course, if folks can manage the required infrastructure themselves, that's works :)

I see. :) When the date of the talk will approach, I will see if it will be possible to use the BlueJeans (something like Skype) for this, because Red Hat is already paying for it and we have our working setup here, which I could easily use for the streaming. If that wouldn't be possible, some other possibility like YouTube Live (etc.) could be used. :)

I spoke to few of the others that are helping out with the sessions. This is what came out of it:

The new release is a few weeks away. Most of the community, including marketing, will be focussed on the release a few weeks either side of it. So, it may be best to start the classroom sessions a few weeks after the release. That way the classrooms are separate enough from the release to neither take away any focus, nor be lost in the midst of all the release related activity.

Given that release is due on 27/6 at the moment, how do you feel about taking the session in the week of 25/7? Even if the release slips by a week, there's still a 3 week buffer?

The plan is to have one classroom session a week. Any day (working day?) in the designated week works - we want to let the instructors choose the time and day of the session that works best for them. Hopefully marketing will pull in enough "students".

Thoughts? :)

We are going to close this ticket as a direct follow up to the specific people you want to target will be more useful. If you have further council issues feel free to open a new request or email the council-discuss list.

Metadata Update from @bex:
- Issue close_status updated to: no action needed
- Issue status updated to: Closed (was: Open)

2 years ago

Hello @ankursinha and @bex! Sorry for being quite for some time, I had to deal with my personal problems and I was engaged in some important things related to my work...

Anyway, the start on 25.7.2017 sounds reasonable for me. :) I can try to do it every week, but I'm not sure it will be always possible. (We might switch to doing it every other week later if the situation forces me to do so. And I honestly don't think that so many people will be interested in hearing about the history. :) )

Anyway, I suggest we start an e-mail thread to continue in this conversation if needed. ;)

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